July 12, 2012

the three MOST honest minutes in television history. EVER. 

UUFF.

(Source: eatprayqueeef, via newvandownbytheriver)

May 18, 2012
life:

A half-century ago, on a spring night in New York City, 35-year-old Marilyn Monroe — literally sewn into a sparkling, jaw-droppingly tight dress — stood in a spotlight on a dark stage. She took a breath, began to sing — and 15,000 men and women who filled the old Madison Square Garden that night knew, simply knew, that they were seeing and hearing something that they would never, ever forget.
The song, of course, was “Happy Birthday,” and Marilyn’s breathy, intimate rendition — sung, as if the two of them were utterly alone, to President John F. Kennedy — has been celebrated, analyzed and lovingly parodied countless times in the five decades since that indelible performance.
LIFE’s Bill Ray was there — and now, we present a set of unpublished from that unforgettable night.

I DONT USUALLY REBLOGBUTTHIS IS CLASSIC. 

life:

A half-century ago, on a spring night in New York City, 35-year-old Marilyn Monroe — literally sewn into a sparkling, jaw-droppingly tight dress — stood in a spotlight on a dark stage. She took a breath, began to sing — and 15,000 men and women who filled the old Madison Square Garden that night knew, simply knew, that they were seeing and hearing something that they would never, ever forget.

The song, of course, was “Happy Birthday,” and Marilyn’s breathy, intimate rendition — sung, as if the two of them were utterly alone, to President John F. Kennedy — has been celebrated, analyzed and lovingly parodied countless times in the five decades since that indelible performance.

LIFE’s Bill Ray was there — and now, we present a set of unpublished from that unforgettable night.

I DONT USUALLY REBLOG
BUT
THIS IS CLASSIC. 

(via timelightbox)

May 10, 2012

I KNOW…

I Post Primarily Music 
BUT
I Dig Marketing As Well.
Ironically, I’m Not Materialistic.

Ladies & Gentlemen…
The Dopest Marketing Mind in The Game

SETH GODIN.

April 25, 2012

TIME Magazine
presents
Game Changers.

Barry Scheck, Justice Seeker

April 9, 2012

R.I.P
Mike Wallace

News veteran Mike Wallace has passed away at age 93..
He was a reporter on CBS’s 60 Minutes since the show launched in 1968 and earned himself the reputation as one of the best interviewers the show ever had.

HE IS BY FAR ONE OF THE BEST INTERVIEWERS EVER.
BACK WHEN I WAS YOUNG BUCK,
IF THIS MUSIC THING DIDN’T WORK,
I WANTED TO BE A JOURNALIST.
TRAVEL AROUND THE WORLD & WRITE ABOUT IT… WHO WOULDNT WANT TO DO THAT?!
WELL, MIKE WALLACE WAS ONE OF THE BEST TO DO IT.
REST IN PEACE GOOD MAN.
REST IN PEACE.

March 28, 2012
vicemag:

We all know that pumping heroin into your veins turns you into a phenomenal artist. Basquiat? Cobain? Burroughs? Have you seen the shit they were putting out before they started using? Of course you have, because it was put on your high school syllabus to teach you that you’ll never be able to create real art without a smack habit. But one group of artists your school books might not have mentioned are the dealers who use their own graphics to beautify their heroin baggies. Kind of like acid tab art, I guess, only more sinister and likely to kill you.Dequincey Jynxie is a female heroin user who runs a blog of the same name. It’s basically a photo archive of all the various heroin stamps floating around the Brooklyn and Manhattan areas, with reviews of the product itself so that other users have a real-time directory of what’s going to make them nod off into a state of blissful, introspective somnolence, and what’s going to leave them puking water and bile for hours. By the way, I’m pretty certain Dequincey Jynxie is an allusion to Thomas de Quincey, and not her real name. That’d be too heavy a self-fulfilling prophecy to heap on a kid.VICE: Hey Jynxie. What’s the story behind your heroin stamp archive blog?Dequincey Jynxie: Well, I was cleaning out my room, disposing of various trash and paraphernalia, when I found a variety of old stamps I’d tossed aside and decided I wanted to document them somehow. At first it was just images, but I added the reviews as it grew, almost as a notation to myself in case I came across something in the future. I started to save bags en masse, but eventually it got to be too much, as I was looking at a $30,000 pile of glassines to keep them all in, which probably could have paid for grad school or a sailboat. Fuck.What is it about the art on heroin bags that you love so much?My background is in fine art, and I worked as a mass market designer for a while, so I was always amused and excited by the branding. I also wanted to keep tabs on the quality of the product, especially if something was particularly good, bad, or just dangerous, so the site could work as a form of harm reduction.
Continue reading: The Art of Heroin Bags

A Little Afternoon Read.

vicemag:

We all know that pumping heroin into your veins turns you into a phenomenal artist. Basquiat? Cobain? Burroughs? Have you seen the shit they were putting out before they started using? Of course you have, because it was put on your high school syllabus to teach you that you’ll never be able to create real art without a smack habit. But one group of artists your school books might not have mentioned are the dealers who use their own graphics to beautify their heroin baggies. Kind of like acid tab art, I guess, only more sinister and likely to kill you.

Dequincey Jynxie is a female heroin user who runs a blog of the same name. It’s basically a photo archive of all the various heroin stamps floating around the Brooklyn and Manhattan areas, with reviews of the product itself so that other users have a real-time directory of what’s going to make them nod off into a state of blissful, introspective somnolence, and what’s going to leave them puking water and bile for hours. By the way, I’m pretty certain Dequincey Jynxie is an allusion to Thomas de Quincey, and not her real name. That’d be too heavy a self-fulfilling prophecy to heap on a kid.

VICE: Hey Jynxie. What’s the story behind your heroin stamp archive blog?
Dequincey Jynxie: Well, I was cleaning out my room, disposing of various trash and paraphernalia, when I found a variety of old stamps I’d tossed aside and decided I wanted to document them somehow. At first it was just images, but I added the reviews as it grew, almost as a notation to myself in case I came across something in the future. I started to save bags en masse, but eventually it got to be too much, as I was looking at a $30,000 pile of glassines to keep them all in, which probably could have paid for grad school or a sailboat. Fuck.

What is it about the art on heroin bags that you love so much?
My background is in fine art, and I worked as a mass market designer for a while, so I was always amused and excited by the branding. I also wanted to keep tabs on the quality of the product, especially if something was particularly good, bad, or just dangerous, so the site could work as a form of harm reduction.

Continue reading: The Art of Heroin Bags

A Little Afternoon Read.

March 25, 2012

Azealia Banks:
Debuts New Song at Chanel Party

SHE’S. DOPE.

March 25, 2012

jessekirshbaum:

This kid is a hell of a salesman!

LMAO!
YES!!!!

March 22, 2012
vicemag:

If you have even a cursory interest in hip-hop, rhythm and blues, and/or hi-top fades, chances are you’ve heard about Canadian dark R&B mega-sensation the Weeknd. You are also probably aware that the main man behind the project is a 22-year-old ex-American Apparel employee named Abel Tesfaye. He’s done very well for himself in a very short period of time—becoming BBFs with Drake, securing an upcomi”ng 2012 Coachella performance, and remixing a Lady Gaga song within a year of his free mixtape debut House of Balloons.
The tidal wave of hype that has been building over the last 12 months began with the release of three songs: “What You Need,” “Loft Music” and “The Morning (Original Version).” Discerning listeners might remember that the production of these standout tracks was originally credited to a guy named Jeremy Rose, who has since parted ways with Abel. Yet, until now, no one knew the full story of why and how the split happened.
The handful of Weeknd fans and music journalists who have followed the story have only been able to discern that “creative differences” were to blame, Jeremy is now producing under the moniker Zodiac, and that all mentions of his name had been scrubbed from the final version of House of Balloons. Recently, Jeremy decided to set the record straight, and the facts ain’t pretty. After our interview, I attempted to reach out to Abel to see if he had anything to add to the discourse. A member of his crew who goes by the name “XO” got back to me via Facebook, claiming that Abel had “no comment.”
VICE: What’s your backstory? When did you start making music?Jeremy Rose: I was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and lived around Nova Scotia, mostly Dartmouth, until I was ten. It’s kind of a shitty town, so my parents, my brother, and me moved to Chatham, Ontario. I lived there until I was about 21. Chatham is a small town surrounded by cornfields. Nothing to do. Lots of drug use. Teen moms. Stuff like that. The music scene there was just kids playing screamo shit. I didn’t really fit in, so that’s why I got out. Then I moved to Toronto. I had some intentions of doing music out here, but I’ve always been a slow worker. I really take my time with it.
How did you first meet Abel?My girlfriend was working at Poutini’s [a poutine spot in Toronto, obviously] and I used to hang out with a couple of these Australian guys that worked there. That’s where I met Abel, he was hanging out at their house. I was showing them some things in Ableton, because they were interested in that stuff and I was playing the beat for “What You Need.” I had that thing for a couple years and I didn’t know what to do with it. Anyway, Abel was there and he started free-styling on top of it.
So that was the impetus of the Weeknd?Yeah, that’s when I asked him if he wanted to work on something—I had this idea for a dark R&B project. I think I talked to Curtis Santiago [aka Talwst, local Toronto R&B dude] about it, but he wasn’t really what I was looking for because he was on some other thing. Abel seemed to suit the project.
Continue

I WORK IN MUSIC PUBLISHING.AND THIS IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF ALWAYS MAKING SURE YOUR PAPERWORK IS RIGHT.SHIT…THAT’S WITH ANY BUSINESS.

vicemag:

If you have even a cursory interest in hip-hop, rhythm and blues, and/or hi-top fades, chances are you’ve heard about Canadian dark R&B mega-sensation the Weeknd. You are also probably aware that the main man behind the project is a 22-year-old ex-American Apparel employee named Abel Tesfaye. He’s done very well for himself in a very short period of time—becoming BBFs with Drake, securing an upcomi”ng 2012 Coachella performance, and remixing a Lady Gaga song within a year of his free mixtape debut House of Balloons.

The tidal wave of hype that has been building over the last 12 months began with the release of three songs: “What You Need,” “Loft Music” and “The Morning (Original Version).” Discerning listeners might remember that the production of these standout tracks was originally credited to a guy named Jeremy Rose, who has since parted ways with Abel. Yet, until now, no one knew the full story of why and how the split happened.

The handful of Weeknd fans and music journalists who have followed the story have only been able to discern that “creative differences” were to blame, Jeremy is now producing under the moniker Zodiac, and that all mentions of his name had been scrubbed from the final version of House of Balloons. Recently, Jeremy decided to set the record straight, and the facts ain’t pretty. After our interview, I attempted to reach out to Abel to see if he had anything to add to the discourse. A member of his crew who goes by the name “XO” got back to me via Facebook, claiming that Abel had “no comment.”

VICE: What’s your backstory? When did you start making music?
Jeremy Rose: I was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and lived around Nova Scotia, mostly Dartmouth, until I was ten. It’s kind of a shitty town, so my parents, my brother, and me moved to Chatham, Ontario. I lived there until I was about 21. Chatham is a small town surrounded by cornfields. Nothing to do. Lots of drug use. Teen moms. Stuff like that. The music scene there was just kids playing screamo shit. I didn’t really fit in, so that’s why I got out. Then I moved to Toronto. I had some intentions of doing music out here, but I’ve always been a slow worker. I really take my time with it.

How did you first meet Abel?
My girlfriend was working at Poutini’s [a poutine spot in Toronto, obviously] and I used to hang out with a couple of these Australian guys that worked there. That’s where I met Abel, he was hanging out at their house. I was showing them some things in Ableton, because they were interested in that stuff and I was playing the beat for “What You Need.” I had that thing for a couple years and I didn’t know what to do with it. Anyway, Abel was there and he started free-styling on top of it.

So that was the impetus of the Weeknd?
Yeah, that’s when I asked him if he wanted to work on something—I had this idea for a dark R&B project. I think I talked to Curtis Santiago [aka Talwst, local Toronto R&B dude] about it, but he wasn’t really what I was looking for because he was on some other thing. Abel seemed to suit the project.

I WORK IN MUSIC PUBLISHING.
AND
THIS IS A GREAT EXAMPLE
OF
ALWAYS MAKING SURE YOUR PAPERWORK IS RIGHT.
SHIT…THAT’S WITH ANY BUSINESS.

March 19, 2012

Steve Stoute x Nas:
Talk About Overcoming Fear @ SxSW.

MORAL OF THE STORY:
FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS.
DONT FOLLOW THE MONEY.
AND IF YOU FEEL REALLY STRONGLY ABOUT SOMETHING,
DONT LET PEOPLE CHANGE YOU.
BE TRUE TO
YOU.